Alerta artículos de revista 2012/05/10

Vaciado de articulos de revista
I nfoTrad 10 de MAYO de 2012


Alice, Y. W. Chan “Cantonese ESL Learners Use of Grammatical Information in a Monolingual Dictionary for Determining the Correct Use of a Target Word.” International Journal of Lexicography vol. 25, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 68-68. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4EADB4C0AF727AF8FC60

This article reports on the results of an empirical study which investigated the use of a monolingual dictionary by advanced Cantonese ESL learners for determining the correct use of a word. Thirty-one students participated in a grammaticality judgment task using a dictionary with and without explicit grammatical information. Two types of self-reporting protocols and a post-task focus-group interview were employed to tap into the participants’ thinking processes. It was found that a monolingual dictionary was useful in helping learners determine the correct use of a word, yet it was examples rather than explicit grammatical information which helped them most. Various problems were encountered in dictionary consultation, including learners’ difficulty in identifying the transitivity of verbs and the countability of nouns. Inappropriate generalizations were occasionally made from learners’ misreading of examples. It is suggested that ESL professionals incorporate grammar training into dictionary training programs, and that lexicographers’ design and compilation of ESL dictionaries should be informed by empirical dictionary research.

Alsina, Victòria “Translating Free Indirect Discourse: two Spanish versions of Jane Austen’s Persuasion.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 7, n. (2011).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue7-2011/article-alsina-2011.pdf

This paper examines the use of free indirect discourse (FID) to convey the narrator’s attitude and its treatment in translation. FID is a powerful literary device which is often relayed as other modes of discourse in translation. As a result, the effects of FID in the source text are lost in the target text. In this paper, a passage containing a long and complex instance of FID in Jane Austen’s Persuasion (1817) is examined and compared with two of its Spanish translations. It is concluded that the omission of FID in the target text, which involves the loss of the attitudes expressed by it in the source text, is due not only to linguistic differences between the two languages involved but also to differences in their
literary traditions.

Asimakoulas, Dimitris “Dude (Looks Like a Lady). Hijacking Transsexual Identity in the Subtitled Version of Strella by Panos Koutras.” The Translator vol. 18, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 47-75.

Problematizing and relativizing components of culture and identity are a constant theme in translation studies, yet there are fields where culture and identity are radically deconstructed, rather than problematized and relativized; such is the case in the uncharted area of transgenderism. By definition, transgenderism entails both great freedom and great constraints with respect to shaping physical and discourse parameters of identity. Taking Cromwell’s (2006) concept of ‘transsituated identities’ as a point of departure, this article discusses the English subtitles for the cinema in Koutras’ recent film Strella (2009). It demonstrates that the filmic language of Strella adopts strategies which are geared towards unsettling fixed hierarchies in society. Harvey’s (2000) grid of strategies – namely, ludicrism, inversion, paradox and parody – is extended here for the analysis of filmic language. The analysis reveals that the move from a minor code (Greek) into a lingua franca, within the context of a transgender subculture, leads to recurrent shifts in the semiotic load of these resources in translation.

Barambones Zubiria, Josu “Una mirada telescópica al cine en euskera: Versiones originales, dobladas y subtituladas.” Hermeneus: Revista de la Facultad de Traducción e Interpretación de Soria vol., n. 13 (2011).  pp. 25-59. http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/extart?codigo=3823106

Basile, Elena “Responding to the Enigmatic Address of the Other: A Psychoanalytical Approach to the Translator’s Labour.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 1, n. (2005).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue1-2005/basile-NV2005.pdf

The aim of this article is to begin to tease out what it means to pay attention to the affective dimensions of the translator’s labour in contemporary literary translation practices. Drawing from Jean Laplanche’s theory of the formation/transmission of the unconscious as a “drive to translate” triggered by the intimate dynamics  of “primal seduction”, the article seeks to foreground the affective and unconscious components at play in the translation process, and  argues for re-articulating the question of fidelity in translation not in terms of  equivalence, but in terms of the translator’s response-ability towards what Laplanche calls the “enigmatic  message” present in the text of the other. The article further explores how this approach can help us read the “singularities” of translators’ choices in relation to the historically situated generic constraints of translation as a practice of rewriting. Specifically, it does so by looking at a Canadian feminist experiment in collaborative translation first published in 1989, which productively incorporated the question of affect and of the unconscious in translation, and in doing so also creatively modified the gendered libidinal economies of translation practice

Blumczynski, Piotr “The rise and fall of a translational compound: “the only begotten” in the English versions of the New Testament.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 2, n. (2006).  pp. 1-18.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue2-2006/piotr-paper-2006.pdf

The present paper is an attempt to account for the  emergence of the designation “only begotten” in the English Bible, its widespread use in pre-modern versions, and its gradual and almost complete disappearance from most contemporary translations. A close examination of the origins of this designation, traceable to its Latin cognate unigenitus first introduced into the biblical tradition by St. Jerome to render selected occurrences of the Greek adjective monogen s, reveals a unique theological inspiration behind it. “Only  begotten,” recurring in English translation of the  Bible for almost six centuries as an  important christological title, has recently been replaced by translational solutions reflecting a more accurate understanding of the underlying Greek word.

Cacchiani, Silvia “Dis/Similarities between Patient Information Leaflets in Britain and Italy: Implications for the Translator.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 2, n. (2006).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue2-2006/cacchiani-paper-2006.pdf

While we can observe macro-pragmatic equivalence between patient information leaflets (PILs) across languages based on common macro-aims, it is rare to encounter other types of equivalence. Indeed, different cultural backgrounds and assumptions about the readers and their roles motivate significant non-equivalence at the syntactic, structural, lexicosemantic and micro-pragmatic levels. Failure to recognize such differences may affect the process of translation and result in particularly inadequate (cf. Nord 1997) translations. I present the results of a contrastive analysis of a small corpus of British and Italian PILs with the aim to foreground the most significant dissimilarities between the two. Based on the results of this analysis, I look at Italian PILs translated into English in order to assess their functional adequacy. I argue that the characteristics of the genre justify a functional approach to translation and, accordingly, recourse to a strong cultural adaptation to the social needs of the target language.

Calzada Pérez, María “Applying Translation Theory in Teaching.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 1, n. (2005).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue1-2005/calzada-NV2005.pdf

A basic premise of this article is that the institutional teaching of translation studies has evolved in the past decades partly due to a growing  connection between theory and teaching practice. The present article focuses on how seven proponents of various translation theories teach in classrooms, on why theory is important for the teaching of the profession, and on the nature of theory. This discussion leads to a fundamental concern for the training of future translators for professional work. It is argued that translation trainees should be exposed to a variety of approaches to translation which are inspired by and connect to different theoretical schools so that students are in this way taught to be flexible in their approach to texts and will also learn theory in practical application.

Carballeira, Helena Miguélez “Gender-related Issues in the English Translations of Esther Tusquets and Rosa Montero: Discrepancies between Critical and Translational Figurations.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 1, n. (2005).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue1-2005/miguelez-NV2005.pdf

This article explores how the translation of puns and humoristic language in a dramatic text stretches the boundaries of the written text, raising issues of performance and delivery. For this purpose, three functionally different English translations of Goldoni’s Il servitore di due padroni are looked at to investigate how each deals with the traditionally untranslatable aspects of Goldoni’s comedy: his reliance on improvisation and on the expressiveness of the vernacular

Chan Ho-Yan, Clara “Third Person Pronouns in Indigenous Chinese Texts and Translated Chinese Texts: the westernization of modern written Chinese.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 5, n. (2009).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue5-2009/abstract-chan-2009.pdf

The main purpose of this paper is to define the pattern of development of Chinese third person pronouns in terms of gender and number markings, based on the data from  indigenous Chinese texts (newspapers) and translated Chinese texts (the Bible) from three specific periods: 1) 1904-1919; 2) 1952-1953 and 3) 2002-2003. Secondly, it will evaluate the role of ‘grammatical borrowing’ in the Europeanization process of language change through  a systematic comparison between indigenous Chinese and translated Chinese texts, the latter showing the foreign influence. This empirical study asserts that there are great discrepancies in the use of third person pronouns between the two kinds of texts, suggesting that the translated works are a much more open ‘system’ directly influenced by foreign languages during the translation process that allows grammatical borrowing to take place. It is a first step in the systematic analysis of the reasons behind those changes.

Coromines I Calders, Diana “Anger-like Feelings in Translation: Intensity Shifts and Macrostructural Impact. A case-study of G nter Grass’s Unkenrufe and its Catalan and Spanish versions.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 6, n. (2010).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue6-2010/article-coromines-2010.pdf

Like Grass’s other masterpieces,  Unkenrufe has a strong emotional dimension that determines the whole macrostructure of the novel. It is structured around what in terms of Natural Semantic Metalanguage are called ‘anger-like feelings’. Analysing how these are expressed in the Catalan and Spanish versions of the novel may be an effective way to trace major changes operating on a macrostructural  level. Assuming that the novel’s narrator is a key character in which all other voices are included, a set of anger-like feelings expressed by him, and representative of the emotional dimension of the novel, is taken as a starting-point in order to pursue two goals. Firstly, the paper aims to show that the notion of intensity is an appropriate tool to identify and describe shifts resulting from the translation of emotion words and expressions, and secondly, it aims to confirm or refute the initial hypothesis according to which both translations render the narrator’s anger-like feelings as less intense, and that this  carries macrostructural consequences. This hypothesis is partially confirmed: the Catalan version shows no major intensity shifts, but the Spanish version shows consistent and regular lessening of the original anger-like feelings, leading to a macrostructural shift.

Deny Arnos, Kwary “Adaptive Hypermedia and User-Oriented Data for Online Dictionaries: A Case Study on an English Dictionary of Finance for Indonesian Students.” International Journal of Lexicography vol. 25, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 30-30. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4ECBA722473B310DD968

The increase in the quantity of online dictionaries does not seem to go together with an increase in the quality of these dictionaries. This may be due to a lack of focus on dictionary users and the insufficient incorporation of the latest technological features. This article tries to formulate some proposals for future online dictionaries. The discussion starts from an explanation of the user profile, user situation, and user needs. This will then become the basis to review the lexicographical solutions offered by current online dictionaries, and to create proposals for future dictionaries. The discussion includes considerations for using adaptive hypermedia and user-oriented data to create a dictionary which can better meet the various needs of the dictionary users. This article concentrates on an English Dictionary of Finance for Indonesian students, but the principles proposed may also be applicable to other types of online dictionaries.

Eaton, Kate “You Always Forget Something: Can Practice Make Theory?” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 4, n. (2008).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue4-2008/Eaton_2008.pdf

When it comes to the multi-layered process of making a translated play work for the stage (Johnston 1997:7), does translation theory have a role to play? In the collaborative world of theatre, where a play is proved through practice, what room if any is there for theory in the rehearsal room? Might it best be forgotten about entirely? Or left to academics to use when analysing the translation? What are the practical steps that the stage translator might employ to prepare the translated play text for performance? How can the act of translation itself become the research methodology?

Escuín Guinea, Carmen “Elogio del traductor.” Hermeneus: Revista de la Facultad de Traducción e Interpretación de Soria vol., n. 13 (2011).  pp. 17-22. http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/extart?codigo=3822913

Fernandes, Lincoln “Translation of Names in Children’s Fantasy Literature: Bringing the Young Reader into Play.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 2, n. (2006).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue2-2006/fernandes-paper-2006.pdf

This paper discusses the translation of names in children’s fantasy literature and highlights the importance of names in translating this particular text type. First, it defines what it is meant by “names” and attempts to present some of the most important types of “meanings” usually conveyed by names. Then, it discusses the issue of readability in the translation of these narrative elements. Next, building on Hermans’s (1988) ways of rendering names from L1 to L2, it offers a classification of ten translation procedures that were identified in the Portuguese-English Parallel Corpus of Children’s Fantasy Literature, namely PEPCOCFL.

Gamal, Ahmed “Postcolonial Translation as Transformation. Ahdaf Soueif’s I Think of You.” The Translator vol. 18, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 101-118.

Like translation, postcolonial writing involves an act of mediating across languages and cultures. Texts written in English by bilingual anglophone writers often include strategies of transformation similar to those used by politically engaged translators to render the linguistic and cultural specificity of their source cultures. This paper examines this practice in the writing of the Egyptian novelist and cultural critic, Ahdaf Soueif (1950 –  ). It discusses how in addressing a global audience of English speakers, Soueif avoids editorial intrusions and relies extensively on lexical borrowing, contextualization, historical and geographical references, colloquial conversational formulas, culture-distinct metaphors and idioms, relexification and grammatical deviation – all of which enable her English text to accommodate the Arabic language and culture. The paper argues that Soueif’s representation of the personal dilemmas of her female characters, including their physical embodiment, transgresses the dividing line between the private and the public and the sexual and the political in the Islamic-Arab world. In this way, Soueif’s delineation of female private experience in her semi-autobiographical fiction functions as a kind of cultural translation.

González Rodríguez, Luisa María “Reflexiones sobre la traducción al español de los parlamentos dialectales en la novela Sons and Lovers de D. H. Lawrence.” Hermeneus: Revista de la Facultad de Traducción e Interpretación de Soria vol., n. 13 (2011).  pp. 61-82. http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/extart?codigo=3823127

Hague, Daryl R. “Prophets and Pandemonium: creativity in the translating self.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 5, n. (2009).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue5-2009/article-hague-2009.pdf

In Who Translates? Translator Subjectivities beyond Reason, Douglas Robinson (2001) proposes a model of the self that he calls pandemonium. Pandemonium suggests a kind of disaggregated agency in which exterior and interior forces shape and are shaped by each other. As to translator subjectivity, these forces produce competing responses to a source text. This pandemonium model stands in opposition to the Western model, which Robinson considers a “spirit-channeling” model. In this model, the translator has no self; instead, the translator is simply a medium or machine through whom the original author speaks. To illustrate this model, Robinson uses the story of how Joseph Smith produced the  Book of Mormon. Robinson then sets Smith aside. This choice is unfortunate, for Smith’s story actually presents an interesting test case for the pandemonium model. Rather than a case of classic channeling, Smith’s story represents a kind of creativity that successful translators need.

Heller, Lavinia “Translations as Strangers.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 4, n. (2008).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue4-2008/Sumillera_2008.pdf

The following article deals with the importance of  maintaining in the translation of a postcolonial text the richness, in linguistic terms, of the original. It also highlights the risks and implications of not doing so: if language in postcolonial literary works is used to make social and political statements, failing to translate that language diversity in a satisfactory way may also imply the loss, or the damaging, of that statement. To illustrate this point, this paper will discuss three translations into Spanish of Jean Rhys’s most famous novel, Wide Sargasso Sea, which reflects the great linguistic complexity of the Caribbean

Heller, Lavinia “Translations as Strangers.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 4, n. (2008).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue4-2008/Heller_2008.pdf

Metaphors are indispensable to everyday communication as well as to scientific discourse. They convey implicit assumptions underlying our theoretical concepts (Blumenberg 1960, Lakoff and Johnson 2003). In translation studies, metaphors, aside from being treated as problems of translation, have been used in a hermeneutical manner to define prevailing conceptions of translation at different times and within different cultures.  This paper aims to construct a metaphor, that is, to metaphorize translations as ‘strangers’ in line with sociological concepts of the stranger (Simmel 1950, Nassehi 1995, Stichweh 1992, 1997, 2002, 2004). The objective is to stake out an imaginary field in which the interrelation between translation and the receiving system can be conceived. This epistemically ‘productive’ analogy may offer a glimpse into how translation processes may not necessarily be the result of intentions of certain actors, but may instead be the outcome of a complex and dynamic interrelation between a text and its receiving system.

Hess, Maya. “Translating Terror. The (Mis)application of US Federal Prison Rules in the Yousry Case.” The Translator vol. 18, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 23-46.

On 10 February 2005, a New York jury convicted Mohamed Yousry, an Arabic interpreter and translator, of two related offenses: (1) violating US federal prison rules, called Special Administrative Measures (SAMs), designed, inter alia, to prevent high-risk inmates from communicating with confederates on the outside; and (2) aiding and abetting an Egyptian terrorist organization (U.S. v. Ahmed Abdel Sattar, Lynne Stewart, and Mohamed Yousry, 2005).  By tracing Yousry’s path from judiciary interpreter to prisoner, this article explores the legislative history of the SAMs, discusses their application/misapplication and sheds light on how this landmark case transformed the professional landscape for interpreters in the United States post-9/11. To highlight some of the implications for the profession and the discipline, it draws on current literature on translation and interpreting in situations of conflict. It also positions the verdict in the larger context of US national security and offers policy suggestions geared toward protecting this increasingly vulnerable profession.

Jääskeläinen, Michael “Gulliver’s Travels into Finnish: Translations of Swift’s Social Critique 1876–1932.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 3, n. (2007).  pp. 1-18.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue3-2007/jaasklainen_paper_2007.pdf

This is a report on a study proposing a flexible, easily replicable method for looking at the translator’s style in literary translation. Four literary English-language narrative texts and their Finnish translations are analysed to identify and categorize recurring patterns of optional translation shifts, with emphasis on non-semantic aspects. It is argued that the recurring patterns of optional choices made by the  translator represent features of the translator’s personal ‘style’, ‘voice’, or (local and global) ‘strategies’, which constitute a ‘translator profile’.

Jiménez-Bellver, Jorge “Speaking in an Other’s Words: Coloniality, Neo-Babelianism, and Translation in Guillermo Gómez-Peña’s ‘The New World Border’.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 6, n. (2010).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue6-2010/article-jimenez-2010.pdf

In this article I draw from Roman Jakobson’s ‘translation “proper”’, Jacques Derrida’s ‘différance’ and ‘dissémination’, and Homi Bhabha’s ‘cultural translation’ to approach traditional models of translation vis-à-vis questions of coloniality, racialization, and minoritization involved in the construction of Hispanic/Latina/o ethnicity in the United States. Then I look at border writing and, more specifically, at Guillermo Gómez-Peña’s performance piece ‘The New World Border’ in order to discuss translation as a paradigmatic mode of  différance (Derrida 1992), ‘newness’ (Bhabha 1994), and unexpected meanings. Finally, I critique the two-side border model of translation to point to a new understanding of  translation as speaking in an Other’s words that seeks to rethink the ontological dimension of translation from the border and with-in language.

John, Considine “Michael Adams, ed. Cunning Passages, Contrived Corridors: Unexpected Essays in the History of Lexicography.” International Journal of Lexicography vol. 25, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 95-95. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4B3A8C9D03549F3051D8

Jordán Núñez, Kenneth “Análisis contrastativo de la demanda o claim como tipo textual.” Hermeneus: Revista de la Facultad de Traducción e Interpretación de Soria vol., n. 13 (2011).  pp. 83-102. http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/extart?codigo=3823141

Kapsaskis, Dionysis “Translation and Film: On the Defamiliarizing Effect of Subtitles.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 4, n. (2008).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue4-2008/Kapsaskis_2008.pdf

This paper brings together aspects of film theory (Benjamin, Dayan) and translation theory (Venuti, Nornes) in order to investigate some of the aesthetic and political implications of subtitling. It sets out by comparing film and translation as distinct modes of representation in which the wish for realism and authenticity is revealed and concealed in equal measure. The paper then examines the ways in which this paradox complicates the act of subtitling. It is argued that interlingual subtitles have a defamiliarizing effect over both “dominant” and “peripheral” audiences. Subtitles give rise to perceptions of foreignness which have to do with linguistic and cultural difference as well as with the semiotic difference between the verbal and the audiovisual dimensions. However, even as subtitles emphasize questions of alterity, the extent of editorial manipulation they normally undergo is such that their potential for enhancing awareness of the foreign is drastically restricted.

Lindsay Rose, Russell “This is What a Dictionary Looks Like: The Lexicographical Contributions of Feminist Dictionaries.” International Journal of Lexicography vol. 25, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 1-1. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4C23A38B849A4CF160C0

Feminist dictionaries published between 1970 and 2006 have received little attention in the world of lexicography. The aim of this article is to establish feminist dictionaries as ambitious revisions of lexicographical theory and practice worthy of historical documentation and contemporary consideration. Feminist dictionaries are shown to propose a form of lexicography that (1) foregrounds the material and personal circumstances of dictionary production, (2) fosters active, opinionated, and exploratory dictionary consumption, and (3) highlights meaning as contextual, contested, personal, and perspectival. This article suggests that remembering and reviving the lexicographical priorities of feminist dictionaries is valuable for telling the history and imagining the future of the dictionary genre.

Luis Pablo, Núñez “Felix San Vicente (ed.). Textos fundamentales de la lexicografia italoespanola (1917-2007). * Felix San Vicente (ed.). Textos fundamentales de la lexicografia italoespanola (1805-1916).” International Journal of Lexicography vol. 25, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 103-103. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=43FCA7BC7C8E93C70368

Maher, Brigid “Attitude and Intervention: A Clockwork Orange and Arancia meccanica.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 6, n. (2010).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue6-2010/article-maher-2010.pdf

This paper examines the Italian translation of Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange, focusing in particular on the language of narration, ‘Nadsat’. This invented argot, based on English but including a good deal of Russian vocabulary, contributes to the novel’s grotesque humour and to the narrator’s manipulation of the readers. In Floriana Bossi’s Italian translation, the Russian influence on Nadsat is almost completely missing; she draws instead on Italian and dialectal vocabulary. This results in a considerable change to what in the source text is a very foreign-sounding  argot. I investigate the effect that Bossi’s approach has on the humour of the narration and on the audience’s potential involvement with the main character. Notions of violent language and the violence of translation are discussed, as is the extent to which Bossi’s approach is shaped by linguistic incompatibility, target-culture poetics, and ideologies about the role of the translator.

Marinetti, Christina “The Limits of the Play Text: Translating Comedy.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 1, n. (2005).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue1-2005/marinetti-NV2005.pdf

This article explores how the translation of puns and humoristic language in a dramatic text stretches the boundaries of the written text, raising issues of performance and delivery. For this purpose, three functionally different English translations of Goldoni’s Il servitore di due padroni are looked at to investigate how each deals with the traditionally untranslatable aspects of Goldoni’s comedy: his reliance on improvisation and on the expressiveness of the vernacular

Minelli, Elena “Punctuation Strategies in the Textualization of Femininity: Virginia Woolf Translated into Italian.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 1, n. (2005).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue1-2005/minelli-NV2005.pdf

This article investigates shifts in punctuation in the Italian translations by Nadia Fusini of Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway  and  To the Lighthouse. It argues that shifts in textual cohesion contribute to the elimination of salient traits of Woolf’s ‘female sentence’. Shifts in punctuation are analyzed in the light of discourse and gender theories, and particular attention is paid to the use of the semicolon, the exclamation mark, the dash and the full stop.

Mininni, Maria Isabella “Il Giovane Pasolini traduttore di Juan Ramón Jiménez.” Hermeneus: Revista de la Facultad de Traducción e Interpretación de Soria vol., n. 13 (2011).  pp. 103-126. http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/extart?codigo=3824011

Moir, Catherine “Translational Resonance, Authenticity and Authority in the Bible and the Quran: translation and religious change.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 5, n. (2009).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue5-2009/article-hague-2009.pdf

Challenging the traditional conception of what makes a religious text “translatable”, this paper attempts to explain why there are such marked differences between religions in their acceptance of translations of their scriptures, and why there is such a varying impact of translation on religious thought and practise. The paper suggests that the scriptural genre is distinct from other areas of translation studies research and introduces the concept of “translational resonance” as a means of approaching the translation of religious texts. Translational resonance is defined as the degree to which a religious text is accepted as authentic and authoritative in translation. Using the Bible and the Quran as examples, it will ask what effect translation has on religious attitudes and behaviours: whether (and, if so, under what circumstances) translation can undermine religious authority, and whether the translational resonance of a text, according to the author’s definition, can help to explain the relationship between scriptural authority and religious change.

Mullamaa, Kristina “Towards a Dynamic Role Model of Liaison Interpreters: self-descriptions of practitioners in Estonia.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 5, n. (2009).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue5-2009/article-mullamaa-2009.pdf

In 2003-2006, a study on the evolving role model of liaison interpreters in Estonia was carried out (Mullamaa 2005; Mullamaa 2006a). The study offered insights into a specific translation culture (Prun 1997) and illuminated how a professional role is developing in tandem with socio-political and economic changes. The study specifically shed light on the way interpreters view their role a) against the background of working in a totalitarian regime, b) at the beginning of the independence period of a small state, and c) through the different developing stages of democratic evolution and the rising market economy. The results suggest that the 16-year time-span in Estonia after the collapse of the Soviet Union has offered favourable conditions for the development of some principles and strategies that might not have been possible in a more ideologically dogmatic political climate. I applied the methodological framework of ethnography and the principles of chaining; 14 practitioners were identified and interviewed. I analyzed the transcripts and looked at 217 excerpts in which practicing liaison interpreters describe their role. This article sums up the main results of the study.

Niloofar, Mansoory, Shamsfard Mehrnoush, et al. “Compound Verbs in Persian Wordnet.” International Journal of Lexicography vol. 25, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 50-50. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4E8DA2D9F89BA7E2189A

This paper discusses some linguistic issues in developing the Persian WordNet of verbs with a special focus on Persian compound verbs. It begins with describing different types of compounding mechanisms in verbs and the grammatical structure and semantic properties of each type. It then continues with discussing the lexical and conceptual relations between compound verbs in the Persian WordNet and, finally, talks about the way that properties are used in the semi-automatic extraction of compound verbs and their relations from dictionaries and text corpora.

Parlevliet, Sanne “”It beseems me not to say”: Irony as a device to design a dual audience in translations for children.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 3, n. (2007).  pp. 1-18.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue3-2007/parlevliet-paper-2007.pdf

This paper examines the use of the definition of irony offered by relevance theory in its capacity as a strategy to address two different audiences in translations for children. Given that one of the main aims of children’s literature is the socialization of the target audience, translations for children are governed by dominant social, cultural and educational norms. To communicate their awareness of those norms, translators not only address child readers but also adult mediators in their translations. They convey their attitudes toward both the text and its new audience with inter- and intratextual jokes going over the heads of the child readers. On the basis of English and Dutch translations of the medieval beast epic Reynard the Fox, three ways of using irony as audience design will be demonstrated: (1) irony to expurgate the story, (2) irony to reverse the moral message of the tale, and (3) irony to comment on the discourse surrounding the source text.

Pekkanen, Hilkka “The Duet of the Author and the Translator: Looking at Style through Shifts in Literary Translation.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 3, n. (2007).  pp. 1-18.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue3-2007/perkkanen-paper-2007.pdf

This is a report on a study proposing a flexible, easily replicable method for looking at the translator’s style in literary translation. Four literary English-language narrative texts and their Finnish translations are analysed to identify and categorize recurring patterns of optional translation shifts, with emphasis on non-semantic aspects. It is argued that the recurring patterns of optional choices made by the  translator represent features of the translator’s personal ‘style’, ‘voice’, or (local and global) ‘strategies’, which constitute a ‘translator profile’.

Ponce Márquez, Nuria “El arte de traducir expresiones idiomáticas: La finalidad de la funcionalidad.” Hermeneus: Revista de la Facultad de Traducción e Interpretación de Soria vol., n. 13 (2011).  pp. 127-149. http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/extart?codigo=3824019

Pursglove, Glyn “Fakery, serious fund and cultural change: Some motives of the pseudo-translator.” Hermeneus: Revista de la Facultad de Traducción e Interpretación de Soria vol., n. 13 (2011).  pp. 151-176.

Rafael, Vicente L. “Translation and the US Empire: Counterinsurgency and the Resistance of Language. The Translator.” The Translator vol. 18, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 1-22.

In recent years, much has been written about the revival of counterinsurgency as the preferred strategy of the United States-led forces in their ‘global war on terror’. Such a strategy necessarily requires knowledge of the local languages and cultures. This essay focuses on the US military’s attempts to deploy language as a weapon of war through the strategic deployment of translation practices in consolidating military occupation. It looks into such tactics as the training of soldiers in foreign languages, the development of automatic translation systems, and the protocols for expropriating the mediating power of native interpreters. The essay also inquires into the limits and contradictions of such tactics and their implications for the success or failure of counterinsurgency. Finally, it asks whether there are other ways in which translation works in war time that tend to evade the militarization of speech.

Reimerink, Arianne “The Use of Verbs in Research Articles: Corpus Analysis for Scientific Writing and Translation.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 2, n. (2006).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue2-2006/reimerink-paper-2006.pdf

This article describes the results of a study of the use of verbs in the different sections of medical research articles. A corpus of 30 POS-tagged texts was used. The verbs were classified according to their meaning in lexical domains. Results show that the lexical domains are distributed differently in each section of the article. The comparison of these results with those obtained by López Rodríguez (2002) sheds light on the complex relationship between a research article and its abstract. The objective is to learn more about the lexical characteristics of medical English. A proposal is also made for using these results in a more practical manner, for example to enrich an electronic manual with information that could assist professionals and translators with the writing and translation of medical research articles.

Reinhard, Hartmann “Pedro A. Fuertes-Olivera & Henning Bergenholtz (eds.). e-Lexicography. The Internet, Digital Initiatives and Lexicography.” International Journal of Lexicography vol. 25, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 99-99. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=47C1B9B64AA4807BD227

Ribes Traver, Purificación “Ludwig Tieck’s unconventional mediation between cultures: A reassessment of Herr von Fuchs.” Hermeneus: Revista de la Facultad de Traducción e Interpretación de Soria vol., n. 13 (2011).  pp. 177-207.

Sanz Ortega, Elena “Subtitling and the Relevance of Non-verbal Information in Polyglot Films.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 7, n. (2011).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue7-2011/article-sanz-2011.pdf

This paper focuses on the relevance of non-verbal information when subtitling films belonging to the polyglot film genre. As this cinematic production normally uses language diversity to portray communication problems among cultures, fictional characters tend to resort to non-verbal signs to surmount language barriers. This means that non-verbal elements tend to play a key role in understanding this film genre and, consequently, need to be carefully considered when translating. Due to the polysemiotic nature of audiovisual products and following Vanoye s differentiation of horizontal and vertical dimensions of artefactual conversation (1985), a multimodal approach is used with the purpose of analyzing the function of non-linguistic signs and how they are used when subtitling two scenes from a polyglot film titled Spanglish. The analysis reveals the important interplay of subtitles  and non-verbal signs for the understanding of the multicultural and multilingual problems depicted in this film genre.

Schäffner, Christina “The Importance of Text.” The Translator vol. 18, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 119-127.

Schäffner, Christina. 2012. The Importance of Text. The Translator: Volume 18, Number 1: 119-127 review of: Translation as Text. Albrecht Neubert and Gregory M. Shreve. Kent, Ohio & London: The Kent State University Press, 1992. x+171 pp. ISBN 0-87338-469-5, $25.

Siu, Sai Cheong “Theorizing Buddhist Scripture Translation as an Act of Giving: a Buddhist Perspective.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 4, n. (2008).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue4-2008/Siu_2008.pdf

Buddhist scripture translation, the first of the three large-scale translation activities in China, enhanced the propagation of Buddhist doctrine in East Asia and the development of Chinese literature in the first millennium. It was different from other forms of translation activities due to its religious nature. Sometimes it was even considered by Buddhists to be an act of charity, rather than a mere act of translation. It was also closely related to a wide range of Buddhist activities, such as chanting scriptures and holding lectures on the Dharma.

Sumillera, Rocío G. “Postcolonialism and Translation: the Translation of Wide Sargasso Sea into Spanish.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 4, n. (2008).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue4-2008/Sumillera_2008.pdf

The following article deals with the importance of  maintaining in the translation of a postcolonial text the richness, in linguistic terms, of the original. It also highlights the risks and implications of not doing so: if language in postcolonial literary works is used to make social and political statements, failing to translate that language diversity in a satisfactory way may also imply the loss, or the damaging, of that statement. To illustrate this point, this paper will discuss three translations into Spanish of Jean Rhys’s most famous novel, Wide Sargasso Sea, which reflects the great linguistic complexity of the Caribbean

Toratani, Kiyoko “Translating Mimetics in Japanese: a cognitive approach.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 5, n. (2009).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue5-2009/article-toratani-2009.pdf

This article examines how Japanese mimetics, such as  kira-kira,‘glitteringly,’ are dealt with in the English translation of two Japanese novels,  Kitchen and  The River Ki. Previous studies note that the concepts conveyed by adverbial mimetics are often translated into different word-classes such as verb or noun, which shows an involvement of ‘class-shifts’ (Catford 1965) in the translation of mimetics. This study analyzes these class-shifts, focusing on the process of translation. An investigation of the source language and target language texts shows that there are some systematic class-shifts. It is argued that they can be explained based on concepts defined in cognitive semantics (i.e. ‘lexicalization patterns’, ‘reification’). Senses that may be undertranslated or lost in translation are shown to come from two main areas:  aspectual senses and detailed characterization of event participants. Given the complexity of the semantics of mimetics, some mimetics may be inevitably untranslatable by a single term. However, fuller understanding of verbal semantic ‘conflation’ (Talmy 1972) patterns between Japanese and English and enhanced sensitivity toward reconceptualization processes (Talmy 2000a, 2000b) offer insights into understanding how mimetics can best be translated.

Valero Garcés, Carmen, Laure Gauthier, et al. “Traducción, lenguas de la inmigración y recursos online.” Hermeneus: Revista de la Facultad de Traducción e Interpretación de Soria vol., n. 13 (2011).  pp. 209-232.

Van Wyke, Be “Borges and Us. Exploring the Author-Translator Dynamic in Translation Workshops.” The Translator vol. 18, n. 1 (2012).  pp. 77-100.

The traditional notion of the translator as someone who should remain invisible while reproducing the original and/or intentions of the author is still commonplace today in translation workshops. Although it has been radically called into question by poststructuralist theory, this type of theory often does not ‘translate’ into what students understand as the practice of the craft. The essay draws on a comparative study used with the author’s students that involved eight English versions of Jorge Luis Borges’s 1960 text ‘Borges y yo’ to indirectly introduce them to poststructuralist notions of translation, reading and authorship that can help them confront the limitations of the traditional conception of translation and assist them in developing the critical capacity to work responsibly through the complexities involved in the task of rewriting someone else’s text in another language. This activity – with its combination of close readings of the eight translations together with an analysis of the text’s plot in the context of the contemporary notion of the ‘death of the author’ – helps students discover that they cannot escape complex ethical decisions related to their agency both as readers of an ‘original’ and as authors of their translations, even when, as is the case with one of the translations, the author has collaborated with the translator.

Vargas-Urpi, Mireia “The Interdisciplinary Approach in Community Interpreting Research.” New Voices in Translation Studies vol. 7, n. (2011).  pp.: http://www.iatis.org/images/stories/publications/new-voices/Issue7-2011/article-vargas-2011.pdf

Community interpreting is a complex activity  that has been studied from many different angles. Based on a review of the literature, this paper aims to highlight the importance of an interdisciplinary approach in community interpreting research, as well as the close relationship between the theoretical and methodological frameworks that have been used to date. As a prospective study and by describing theories applied from five different fields (i.e. anthropology, sociology, applied linguistics, communication sciences and psychology), it seeks to provide a comprehensive outline of the interdisciplinary approach adopted in community interpreting research as a basis for future studies in this field. Finally, it suggests a map for this interdisciplinarity, which attempts to reflect how the different disciplines can converge and complement each other for the purpose of research

Veiga Díaz, María Teresa “Enseñar a comprender textos científicos: Retos y estrategias.” Hermeneus: Revista de la Facultad de Traducción e Interpretación de Soria vol., n. 13 (2011).  pp. 233-257.

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