Alerta artículos de revista 2012/07/26

Articulos
U
niversidad deS alamanca
F acultad de Traducciión y D ocumentación
B iblioteca
Web

Alerta de articulos de revista
I nfoTrad 26 de Julio de 2012


Anabel, Galán-Mañas “Margaret Nicolson, Linda Murphy, and Margaret Southgate. Language Teaching in Blended Contexts.” Babel: Revue internationale de la traduction/International Journal of Translation vol. 58, n. 2 (2012).  pp. 243-246. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4210960E2D6B0112BBFE

El libro trata de la enseñanza de idiomas en la modalidad semipresencial o combinada en la educación superior o en la formación de adultos, es decir, aquella que incorpora las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación y “combina” la educación a distancia con sesiones presenciales. La obra va dirigida a profesores de idiomas y a aquellos profesionales que se dedican a la formación de profesores de idiomas, y se ha diseñado para que se pueda leer en su conjunto o seleccionar alguno de sus capítulos.

Aziz Thabit, Saeed “Difficulties Arab translation trainees encounter when translating high frequency idioms.” Babel: Revue internationale de la traduction/International Journal of Translation vol. 58, n. 2 (2012).  pp. 181-204. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4B4591F0D809DAF07293

Translating idioms is one of the major difficulties that translation trainees encounter during their training period and, perhaps, in the beginning stages of their career. This difficulty is ascribed to many reasons including the usual non-transparency and cultural specificity that idioms embody. More often than not, the component words that make an idiom do not always reveal the overall meaning intended by the idiom. For instance, in Keep your hair on, the meaning of the individual words do not give the slightest idea of the meaning of the idiom. While the surface meaning of the components of this idiom imply keeping one’s hair neat, the idiom means ‘don’t be mad or be calm.’ What makes the issue thornier for beginning translators is the fact that most idioms are cultural specific. For Baker (1992: 68), the association of an idiom “with culture-specific context” is what makes it “untranslatable or difficult to translate”. Chen (2009: 44) maintains, “idioms are usually culture-loaded expressions.” Thus, for an Arab translator to make sense of what keep your hair on means, he or she has to be familiar with the culture of the SL. In Britain, people do not usually wear something on their heads as is the case in most Arab countries where head covering is very common. Therefore, if one gets mad, there is a possibility that one’s hair may get mussed. For an immature translator, grasping this cultural specific implication or thinking along these lines might not be easy.

Clara Ho-Yan, Chan “Bridging the Gap between language and law: Translational issues in creating legal Chinese in Hong Kong.” Babel: Revue internationale de la traduction/International Journal of Translation vol. 58, n. 2 (2012).  pp. 127-144. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4E2E9D61426D7BCDAB97

Until 1997, when Hong Kong returned to China’s sovereignty as a special administrative region, its official language of Hong Kong had always been English. This political change prompted the addition of Chinese as another official language in the territory where the native language of the majority is Cantonese (Li 1987: 120). To prepare for the bilingual legislation made possible by the high degree of autonomy and ‘one country, two systems’ policy stipulated in the Joint Declaration of 1984, the Hong Kong Government began the translation of English common law
into Chinese.

Dídac, Pujol “Enric Gallén, Francisco Lafarga & Luis Pegenaute (eds.).Traducción y autotraducción en las literaturas ibéricas.” Babel: Revue internationale de la traduction/International Journal of Translation vol. 58, n. 2 (2012).  pp. 250-252. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=45B38BEB8C98C90FD9D3

This nearly 400-page book gathers a part of the papers presented at the international conference Las relaciones entre las literaturas ibéricas, which took place in Barcelona in June 2009. The contributions are mainly by experts from all over Spain, but there are also a few from abroad (Portugal and the United States). It must be noted that while most contributions are written in Spanish, some are written in Catalan, Galician and Portuguese.

Hiroko, Furukawa “A Feminist Woman with a Given Female Language: A contradictory figure in the Japanese translation of Margaret Atwoods The Edible Woman.” Babel: Revue internationale de la traduction/International Journal of Translation vol. 58, n. 2 (2012).  pp. 220-235. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4A939A1821C39375ADD8

When a female character’s speech is translated from English into Japanese, the femininity level of the character, as it is likely to be perceived by the reader, can be very different. This results from the explicit marking of femininity and masculinity in the Japanese language. The most striking feature is the use of sentence-final particles, and the speaker’s femininity or masculinity level is indicated by such particles, such as ‘wa’ or ‘no’ (Inoue 2006: 2).

Isolda, Rojas-Lizana “Eterio Pajares Infante. La traducción de la novela inglesa del siglo XVIII.” Babel: Revue internationale de la traduction/International Journal of Translation vol. 58, n. 2 (2012).  pp. 247-249. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4D8DA6621F2CE2F359E3

Eterio Pajares Infante: La traducción de la novela inglesa del siglo XVIII. Ed. Fernando Galvan. Portal Education: C/ Aldave 24 bajo, 01012 Vitoria, 2010, xvi+505 pp. ISBN 978-8493707545 Reviewed by Dr Isolda Rojas-Lizana , School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies, Gordon Greenwood Building (32), Brisbane 4072, The University of Queensland. E-mail: i.rojaslizana@uq.edu.au

Lü, Shisheng and Shuang Li “The role shift of the interpreter to a cultural mediator: From the perspective of cultural orientations and contexting.” Babel: Revue internationale de la traduction/International Journal of Translation vol. 58, n. 2 (2012).  pp. 145-163. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=440494C82273D307B0AF

The interpreter-mediated communication is always an instance of intercultural communication. As the significant influence of cultural differences on the interaction is fully recognized, it is proposed that cultural mediation be included as part of the interpreter’s responsibility. Nevertheless, many researchers and researchminded practitioners in interpreting studies have failed to account for the complex nature of intercultural interactions and so research efforts to date have mostly directed towards an investigation of “what role the interpreter should take”, yet with less attention paid to why and what the interpreter should do as a mediator or where he should step in. This article therefore attempts to extend a theoretical focus to cultural orientations, contexting, and communication, so as to lay down a framework to address the role shift of an interpreter.

Meifang, Zhang “Reading different cultures through cultural translation: On translation of site names in Macau Historic Centre.” Babel: Revue internationale de la traduction/International Journal of Translation vol. 58, n. 2 (2012).  pp. 205-219. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4135A9B01D9C67030D6D

Cultural translation, or cultural approach to translation, is a term widely used “to refer to types of translation which function as a tool for cross-cultural or anthropological research, or indeed to any translation which is sensitive to cultural as well as linguistic factors” (Shuttleworth and Cowie 1997: 35). Such kind of sensitive translation has been widely discussed in the past decades, and theories raised by different scholars from different perspectives. However, up to now, very little research has been done on translations related to Macao, China, which has rich historic cultural legacies and is growing very fast into an international tourist city.

Montserrat Cunillera, Domènech “Les formules impersonnelles dans les textes judiciaires français et leur traduction en espagnol.” Babel: Revue internationale de la traduction/International Journal of Translation vol. 58, n. 2 (2012).  pp. 164-180. http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=420190D36818A7983F78

Les textes juridiques que nous allons étudier dans les pages suivantes appartiennent à une catégorie de textes que l’on peut qualifier de « judiciaires », parce qu’ils correspondent à des décisions de justice, c’est-à-dire des décisions émanant de tribunaux ou organes judiciaires. Ce sont donc des textes fortement spécialisés qui se fondent sur un raisonnement syllogistique (Bocquet 2008 : 52–3). La complexité des textes judiciaires tient en partie à l’existence de deux volets linguistiques spécialisés qui se combinent dans la construction de l’espace discursif : d’une part, un volet commun à tous les arrêts qui englobe les unités lexicales et syntagmatiques propres au domaine procédural et, d’autre part, un volet spécifique formé par le vocabulaire et la phraséologie relevant de la matière particulière sur laquelle porte l’arrêt. Ce dernier volet échappe plus facilement à une volonté de systématisation car il peut mettre en scène, selon l’objet du litige, un très large éventail de thèmes
de la vie quotidienne et des branches du droit

Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Responder

Introduce tus datos o haz clic en un icono para iniciar sesión:

Logo de WordPress.com

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de WordPress.com. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Imagen de Twitter

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Twitter. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Foto de Facebook

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Facebook. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Google+ photo

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Google+. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Conectando a %s

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: